Black Seeded Edamame

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Black Seeded Edamame

4.50

Edamame is not technically what people consider a bean, (as in "phaseolus vulgaris"), but actually a different species of the same family called gylcine max. This was Ken Ettlinger's baby so to speak, and we grew this because of the unusual black pods. They have a habit of shattering very easily, in which the dried pods will curl up and literally the seeds fly out once dry.

80 seeds per pack

Grown at Invincible Summer Farms, Southold, NY

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Edamame Soy Beans
Packet will plant 5 ft row (50 seeds)

A row of early edamame soy beans can be planted in mid to late May.  Soybeans can produce edamame for summer picnics after about 80 days.   Soybeans produce 1-2 foot upright plants which are determinate and bear all at one time for a feast or two.  You may want to succession plant soybeans every two weeks until mid summer for an extended harvest.

 Sow soybean seeds 1-2 inches deep and 10 per foot or row.  In short season regions, start soybeans indoors in peat pots and set them into the garden when the soil becomes warm or plant seeds directly into the ground.

Edamame are prepared by boiling the swollen pods in salted water and squeezing the tender beans out of the pods into your mouth.

Soybeans are a different species than the common bean.  They may cross with one another when planted close together but usually don’t.   They will not cross with garden beans.  Allow the beans to mature on the vines at the end of the season and the pods to dry brown.  A very easy seed saving project.