Greencrop - Bush Green Bean

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NPA.jpg

Greencrop - Bush Green Bean

2.99

Ships January 2017
Slightly curved flat podded green beans are longer (6-7 inches) and slimmer than Italian Romano and remain tender and crisp even when they become slightly lumpy.  Dwarf 18 inch height plants.  White seeds.  Developed for the northeast by New Hampshire Agriculture Extension Service and USDA for it’s concentrated, easy to harvest set of quality pods for ethnic markets. This is a 1957All-American Selections winner.  
50 days. 

150 seeds (15 ft row)

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Green and Wax Bush Garden Beans
Packets will plant a 15 ft. row (140-150 seeds)

One planting will keep a family of three in fresh tender pod beans harvesting the beans two or three times a week during their short production period.  Bush beans are determinate and typically bear over two or three weeks if the young pods are kept picked before the seeds develop.  For a continued harvest through the summer make successive plantings every few three or four weeks until late summer and 10 weeks before the first fall frost.  A late May planting of beans (when soil is warm) is an easy productive, sure crop for gardeners with few disease and pest problems.  

We sow the first beans at the last frost date which is always a risk.  Cold soil can cause seed which is not treated with a fungicide to rot and germination can be erratic.  There is some evidence that dark seeded varieties are more able to germinate under cold soil conditions than white seeded kinds.  Seeds are directly sown in a furrow about an inch deep and 3-4 inches apart.  No need to thin seedlings.  It’s unusual but you can sow seeds indoors a week or two before transfer to the garden at one seedling every 6 inches.  Make sure that you have enough sunlight to keep the seedlings from becoming leggy if you are starting them on a window sill.

We like young beans lightly steamed and then immersed in an oil and vinegar dressing with thin slices on onion, salt and pepper and then chilled for a refreshing salad or tossed into the pan after they are steamed or parboiled with oil and seasonings and maybe stir fry with other vegetables.  Kids will eat the young pods off the plants in the garden.  Try yellow and purple beans for a treat.

Beans seldom cross due to their flower structure so saving pure seed should be easy even if you are growing different kinds.  Let pods fully mature and turn tan or brown while on the plant.  Dry so they are crispy and thrash to remove the seeds out of their pods.